Those damn Hogs

Arkansas Department of Agriculture

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 2/18/2022

27,803 Feral Hogs Removed by Feral Hog Eradication Task Force

Little Rock, AR – The Arkansas Department of Agriculture is pleased to report that 27,803 feral hogs have been removed from the state of Arkansas since January 2020 by members of the Arkansas Feral Hog Eradication Task Force.

The Feral Hog Eradication Task Force was initially created by the Arkansas Legislature during the 2017 general session and was directed to create a plan for the eradication of feral hogs in Arkansas. The Task Force is made up of 21 federal and state agencies and non-government organizations. A list of Task Force members can be found at https://bit.ly/FeralHogTF.

The feral hog removal efforts over the past two years have assisted more than 650 individual private landowners and public properties across the state of Arkansas, including within the Buffalo River Watershed. Members of the Task Force have also hosted eight landowner workshops to raise awareness of the damages caused by feral hogs and available resources to assist with removal.

“The feral hog removals by the Task Force members reflect the continued collaboration and commitment of our county, state, and federal partners to address and minimize damages associated with feral hogs across the state,” said J.P. Fairhead, Feral Hog Eradication Program Coordinator. “The removals and the feedback received from landowners indicate that the efforts of Task Force members and landowners have led to population and damage reduction in areas where our county, state, and federal resources are allocated.”

Feral hogs are an invasive species that are especially destructive to agricultural crops, native wildlife, and young domestic livestock. Feral hogs are found in 39 states and may carry at least 45 bacteria, diseases, and parasites, including Pseudorabies and Brucellosis. Nationally, feral hogs are estimated to cause more than $2 billion in damages each year. In Arkansas, the latest survey by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) estimated that feral swine cause at least $41 million in agricultural damages every year, including $34 million in damages to soybeans, corn, cotton, wheat, hay, pecans, and rice, and $7.3 million in damages to livestock.

Can we send them to Austin, Baton Rouge, or Lexington?

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Or to Big 10 country!

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Columbus, Ohio, would be a good place.

State College, PA, has seen enough wild hogs…

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We started having feral hogs showing up on our farm about 5-6 years ago. Lots have been killed, but I think we’re doing no better than keeping the population level. We’re not having much luck in lowering the numbers. Very destructive creatures

Someone was talking about feral hogs yesterday. They said the sows can have 3 litters a year with 8-10 little pigs. No wonder they are out of control.

Need to send Treylon Burks in with a Bowie knife.

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Seriously hope the task force didn’t mistakenly bring in Illinois State as part of their efforts!

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They are already very thick in Austin and Baton Rouge. Don’t know about Lexington, but doubt it.

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About four years ago.

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I have some private land and leased land in Crossett and wild hogs are a real problem. We are trapping and killing about 50-60 a year and seem to be losing ground, plus the states people are hammering them. They ruin my food plots and improvements for deer, turkey and such.

I’m actually smoking one of them today on my new Yoder pellet grill. Weighs about 50 pounds, but we quartered it. I’ll inject the hams and shoulders to keep it tender, and spritz it during the smoke after I rub everything down good this morning. I’m working on my new barn/shop fixing it up and building a work bench, so this works well. Plus going to watch hoops game this afternoon.

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Curious, how do they taste?

It is just a leaner version of pork. I like to use the crock pot and slow cook some pulled pork. You can also take it to a processor and make sausage links.

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Is it gamey?

Not at all.

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Razor is correct…it’s just leaner bc the animal hasn’t been cooped in a pen it’s whole life, but rather roaming the woods. Free range to the core! I didn’t take me as long to smoke this one today as a store bought hog.

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Sounds like we should be killing and eating these suckers. Why aren’t we?

Lot of us do hunt and eat them. True wild pigs are unique and best eaten when about 200-250 lbs max. Now you do find some ferals in the wild that have bred with different breeds of farm hogs and can tell the difference in them quickly by stature.
Not many processing / slaughter houses take already dead hogs anymore unless your chummy with the owner.

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You certainly do not want one over 250. They are just way too strong. A small, young one can be pretty good.

I first was thinking this was about Chad Morris.

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