They've trimmed down the proposals to speed up college football

  • Keep the clock running after first downs except in the last two minutes of each half.
  • You can’t call consecutive timeouts.
  • A penalty at the end of the first or third quarter will be carried over to the next quarter rather than playing an untimed down at the end of the previous quarter.

It’s estimated that these changes will shorten games by about 8 plays and 8 minutes. Player safety is being cited due to the possibility of 16- or 17-game seasons in the new CFP.

They’re not talking about running the clock after incomplete passes – yet – but you can watch the XFL to see what that looks like; that league is using that rule.

a lot of the problems in my opinion is the games drag on due to the number of commercial at every timeout…and the length of time to review a controversial play…and those commercials are so many so the networks can make their big money

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Commercials won’t change, but maybe we have seen the peak of their usage.

Replays CAN be improved. Technology will only improve that allows for real-time communication between officials, not to mention the ability to monitor things like LOS and boundaries (think about the looming automated strike zone in baseball, which is less complicated but still about to replace a human calling balls and strikes). Much like having a “coach in the box” for the coaches on the sideline, a referee in the presbox in perpetual contact with officials on the field would help…if the support technology is provided.

One thing they could do with commercials (but won’t) is go split screen with the last ad of the break with action resuming on one side of the screen. It has worked okay with golf and auto racing telecasts. But that might be hard to sell to that advertiser.

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@SwineFusion, conversely, it also gives the network a “discount” ad spot. Make that a 10-second ad with split screen. Seems like a “both/and” solution - one more ad, but a short one that is split screen.

Hmm. The hurry-up offenses take that away as a “mid-drive” advertising option.