SI's Andy Staples on why the NCAA will not punish

the Baylor Bear football program. And I think he is absolutely right. If you are pissed, read at least the last paragraph to find out what you can do to change NCAA rules and regulations to cover these types of incidents.

https://sports.yahoo.com/news/why-ncaa- … 41562.html

One argument is the PR hit will punish Baylor to the point it hurts recruiting in all sports. It has to a certain extent, but not where it probably should.

I’m not a lawyer, but you really hope the lawsuits bring more accountability and exposes the coverups and any legal wrongdoing where people can actually see some jail time. If some of the stuff is true about the Baylor and Waco police, then some should get fired or prosecuted.

The NCAA overstepped its bounds at Penn State. It will tread lightly with Baylor.

But Baylor is going to hurt from this. Some parents won’t want their children - athletes or otherwise - going there. Enrollment and philanthropy will drop, and it will lose a lot of money in Title IX and other lawsuits. The Big 12 has already said it will withhold a quarter of Baylor’s revenue share next year. There also is the public relations hit that will take years from which to recover.

I agree Richard, there will be further regrettable fallout from known events.

Women’s basketball hasn’t been affected at all. 2016 class had three 5-star recruits sign. 2017 class had one 5-star; two 4-star and one 3-star recruits.

Didn’t check any of the other program rosters.

You would think it should affect women’s sports there the most. Even a top tier women’s bball program like Baylors. One of the victims was a female volleyball player. As a parent I wouldn’t want to send my daughter there to play any sport.

The American public forgets quickly. It may dent the sports programs recruiting slightly, but I think it will be minimal.

We will definitely see how it turns out.

You would think that, but the turmoil at Missouri a couple of years ago with the student protests, etc., has led to a sharp drop in interest from high school students, and enrollments of those high school students, and as a result Misery has had to lay off several hundred employees.

Baylor may be a slightly different case because of the church connection (i.e., if you’re a Texas Baptist you’re supposed to go to Baylor), but IMO enrollment of female students, athlete or not, is eventually going to be affected. It just may not have worked its way through the cycle like the Missouri thing has after two years.

I argued at the time the NCAA overstepped its bounds with Penn St. As reprehensible as the conduct was, an organization shouldn’t punish a member for violating a rule that doesn’t exist. Besides, as Richard points out, criminal & civil law offered proper recourse for the public & the victims. Publicity alone hurt PSU.

Same with Baylor. Baylor’s conduct is worse because it seems more widespread & even institutionalized. With PSU it was one perv who just kept getting protected. It’s a culture at Baylor. I’d like to see criminal prosecutions & several civil lawsuits. And the good Baptists in Texas ought to be appalled. Lord knows I wouldn’t allow my daughter to attend there.

My best friend sent his son to Baylor for graduate school. Of course, he’s a guy, and second, it’s grad school, thus somewhat different, but I keep meaning to ask him if any of that entered into his son’s consideration. May also be that the decision was made before most of the bad publicity surfaced about Baylor’s protection of sexual predators.

I doubt there’s any risk for a guy. At least no risk that’s any greater than going anywhere. However, for a girl…I just don’t like what I’ve read. I know bad things can happen anywhere, but that’s not what makes Baylor such a dangerous place. It’s the total indifference from people who should at least try to protect them.

I’m stunned that Baylor still gets mentioned by so many recruits

I’m torn between whether the NCAA should have jurisdiction in such matters. On one hand, it’s really a criminal and civil matter that the NCAA has no business dealing with, but on the other hand, Baylor’s complete disregard for the law allowed players who would not be eligible in a “clean” program (because they’d be in prison) the opportunity to keep playing. Surely, in the NCAA’s 4 billion pages of rules, there ought to be at least one rule that Baylor broke, if nothing but lack of institutional control. Either way, surely this mess has got to hurt the Bears somehow.

Article on applications and admissions impact through the spring… apparently, Baylor had record application numbers this year.

https://www.google.com/amp/www.houstonc … 013274.php

It’d be easy enough for the NCAA to write a rule that would allow it to penalize a school if it’s found to allow criminal acts by its athletes. If it did that, I wouldn’t be at all upset, but unless & until it does, it shouldn’t punish a school for something the organization doesn’t address.

It’s a bit disturbing. While I’d be afraid to let my daughter go there, I don’t think I’d want my son going to a school who’d be so tolerant of that kind of activity. Certainly not to be part of an athletic program so callous.

I agree, especially in light of the drastic drop in attendance at Mizzou. I would think that a parent would have serious qualms about the good baptists in Wacko.

Great read.

Dissapointing but spot on.

I have suggested worthy of death penalty but that assumes oversight in this kind of matter of course.

Football colleges/boosters lobby against NCAA expansion of oversights in some cases as few want be subjected to scrutiny beyond current levels.

It may be a fact that NCAA can’t do anything in this case.

And it is a shame and I do believe there should be penalties against playing rapists and encouraging rape on campus that go way beyond lack of traditional institutional control guidelines.

As to taking splice that Baylor has suffered appropriately regardless, I respectfully disagree.

Baylor had discovers the money monster of successful athletics and their Board clearly sold their soul.

They will work to mitigate and ultimately pay lawsuits to keep making go away.

While baylor attracts students nationwide, it is a small school located in one of the fastest growing states in the U.S. and Baylor will continue to take advantage of demographic growth and increasing numbers of high school graduates alone in TX who will go there regardless.

We live in TX and yes, some parents may not send a kid there in short term but I’m afraid Baylor will never suffer to the extent warranted.

I have no insight but contend that their Board knew these issues for a long time and did nothing.

Hence the leverage Briles and others had that led to Baylor slow walking decisions in this matter and paying Briles handsomely not to talk.

University presidents vote on rule changes. If they pass a rule like that, they are opening up the possibility that their own cash cow is hammered by the NCAA. They are content with keeping the NCAA toothless on legal matters.

[quote=“bushhog”]
Great read.

Dissapointing but spot on.

I have suggested worthy of death penalty but that assumes oversight in this kind of matter of course.

Football colleges/boosters lobby against NCAA expansion of oversights in some cases as few want be subjected to scrutiny beyond current levels.

It may be a fact that NCAA can’t do anything in this case.

And it is a shame and I do believe there should be penalties against playing rapists and encouraging rape on campus that go way beyond lack of traditional institutional control guidelines.

As to taking splice that Baylor has suffered appropriately regardless, I respectfully disagree.

Baylor had discovers the money monster of successful athletics and their Board clearly sold their soul.

They will work to mitigate and ultimately pay lawsuits to keep making go away.

While baylor attracts students nationwide, it is a small school located in one of the fastest growing states in the U.S. and Baylor will continue to take advantage of demographic growth and increasing numbers of high school graduates alone in TX who will go there regardless.

We live in TX and yes, some parents may not send a kid there in short term but I’m afraid Baylor will never suffer to the extent warranted.

I have no insight but contend that their Board knew these issues for a long time and did nothing.

Hence the leverage Briles and others had that led to Baylor slow walking decisions in this matter and paying Briles handsomely not to talk.[/quote

No idea whether the trustees knew about or attempted to stifle investigations, but without a doubt, at least in my mind, the push-back on the investigations came from someone above Briles.