Persistent rumors on the Twitterverse

That Connor Noland might come back. FWIW

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Whoaaaaaaa

That would be great. At the end of this season, he was pitching the best of his career. Noland was dominate in post season. He has no leverage right now in the MLB draft, so it won’t hurt him for next year’s draft.

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Yes, please!

Would be huge for this team given what they have lost… still don’t believe it will happen but it would be a monumental boost for this team’s confidence going forward.

He does have leverage in the draft this year. Leverage is dependent on having eligibility remaining.

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Whatever he decides I’ll always be a Connor Noland fan.

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I only heard part of the show, but he said something to the effect that if he didn’t go in the first 10 rounds of the draft, he might use his Covid year. He might have been joking as I only heard it in passing.

If he comes back - as Matt says - he would lose leverage. He could lose a lot of money by coming back. But being drafted late does not give you much money anyway, leverage or no leverage. It sometimes depends on the team that drafts you. Some just don’t spend any money. Some spend, spend as far as what they have under the rules.

Agree. Noland is a true Razorback.

One possibility that is always in play with certain college players is that they enjoy the college experience more than the idea of playing minor league baseball. Sometimes good-to-very good players know their ceiling in professional baseball, and decide ahead of time that another year in college (especially their dream school) is better for them personally.

I’m not saying Noland fits that description, but few people know just how strong of a pull wearing that Razorback uniform one more season is for Conner.

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I agree. One thing you imply but don’t say is that Noland might have life plans for some profession or occupation that don’t include sports. Another year of college baseball to get another degree or take more courses might fit those plans quite nicely.

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Having spent time with several former Minor league baseball players, it’s certainly a step down from SEC baseball in most cases. Speaking of travel, facilities and even coaching. And with NIL could be less money. I’ve never talked to anyone that it paid off with a stint in the show. One guy made it to AAA ball and knew immediately he was in over his head. But the love of the game kept most of them going until the grind got to them.

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It’s almost certainly less money if they’re getting anything from NIL at all. Kevin Kopps is most likely making $600 a week in Double A. Rookie league and low-A is even less than that. Signing bonus is nice, but it’s one time only and often doesn’t last very long: Kopps got a reported $300,000. Which is nothing to sneeze at, but he’s probably having to dip into that for living expenses at this point.

I’ll take $600 a week to play Double A baseball. Scouts have told me I have better stuff than Clay Henry.

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Last year Double A was $350 a week. The negative publicity got MLB to bump the pay up from criminal to merely ridiculous.

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Yes. I suppose I did imply that. Probably a Freudian slip, since that scenario applied to me.

Yeah you’re not going to make much money in the minors at all… the trend nowadays is college kids make it to the majors more than high school kids. I think 3 years in the SEC will put you much further ahead than starting off in rookie ball and having to work your way up through the meat grinder that that is. They find out real quickly it is a job!!! Those 14 to 15 hour bus rides are no joke.

side advantages like Bull Durham showed are a mitigating factor, just depends on where you play and how good you are. Pay for play means you have to produce. Greenwood seems to foster elder statesmen Hogs.

I know a certain Ex Hog who made the 1200.00 a month then made the Bigs and went to the major league minimum of around 700k. It was worth the wait :beers:

Stuff is over rated. I want to know your pitchability.

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