OT: FDA gives full approval to Pfizer vaccine

Hopefully this will help turn around the woeful vaccination numbers in Arkansas and elsewhere, before COVID blows up football season and a few thousand other things. The “it’s not fully approved” excuse is no longer valid.

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I suspect it won’t make much of a difference, except for businesses that will mandate it. It’ll be much easier to do that with full FDA approval. Unfortunately, in Arkansas, and a lot of other places, it will take both vaccinations and immunity from having gotten it to really quell this surge. I also don’t see the SEC, or any major sports shutting down like last year.

Well there is also mask wearing, but that’s not exactly popular either. I agree that it’s very unlikely that sports will shut down, but some forfeits are a very real possibility.

I think the vaccination rate is high enough with most teams to avoid forfeits. The bigger problem last year was with quarantine, more so than positive cases.

Regardless of your beliefs the one thing to think about is the FDA also approves every ounce of fast food that is killing our country. Something to think about.

Regulated By the FDA Not Regulated By the FDA
Foods that enter interstate commerce Food Service Establishments
Most packaged foods Restaurants
Most foods solid online Restaurant Chain
Human and animal food Food Truck
Imported Foods Caterer
Farms (if they grow and process food) Grocery Stores
Food Bank
Cafeterias / Institutions
Markets
Home-Food Processor
Alcoholic Beverages
Butcher Shop
Slaughterhouses (USDA)
Farms (if they only grow food)

Maybe if it were true. Which it isn’t, as ricepig’s chart demonstrates. Anything else we can disprove for you?

My belief is that 8 months is perhaps too frequent…

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How about disproving that these are “leaky” vaccines and perhaps thats whats allowing the variants to keep cropping up from the vaccinated. Its not the unvaxxed thats spreading the variants… its the vaxxed.

Ever heard of Merak’s disease? It can give you a bit of insight on what a ‘leaky’ vaccine is and how it comes about.

I do not think it is the type of food, but the amounts being consumed.

When I was young, a 300 pound woman was in a carnival. I see several every time I go shopping.

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Lol, good thing we aren’t chickens, although some appear to be.

No doubt, I’m taken back by the morbid obesity one sees on a daily occurrence.

Doubt the current FDA approval will change much.

From personal experiences with family & friends, most will not get vaccinated until there is an immediate family death or serious life-threatening illness due to COVID. People listen to too much social media nonsense.

Not vaccinating endangers everyone - both thru enabling COVID to mutate into a variant that may make the current vaccine ineffective, & by limiting ERs from providing emergency care to stroke, heart attack, & accident victims. If businesses close & sports events are limited this Fall, we can also blame the unvaccinated.

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Yes, Merak’s Disease is a poultry disease, that still doesn’t invalidate it as an example of how a “leaky” vaccine moves through a population. “Leaky” vaccines are concerns for people. With a “leaky” vaccine the virus will keep spreading throughout the population and make it almost impossible for herd immunity to ever be achieved.

There are three things a vaccine can do: stop you from acquiring the disease altogether, stop onward transmission, and stop symptoms… A perfect vaccine would create what is called “sterilizing” immunity, which means the virus can’t get a foothold in your body at all. Some inoculations (“leaky”), however, do allow low-level infections that people’s immune systems fight off without any symptoms. Their bodies still accumulate a certain quantity of the virus, which they may be able to transmit to others. While this virus is in the bodies it affords the virus an opportunity to mutate into variants.

How did it develop in India where they had basically zero vaccinated?

We’re home this week. I’m impressed with the TV spots encouraging vaccinations from a wide variety of Arkansans. Wish TN would do the same.

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That certainly is not true in Arkansas, since considerably fewer than 50% are vaccinated. It is apparently true that the vaccinated can spread the Delta variant for a few days after being exposed, to primarily the unvaccinated. It also is not the vaccinated that are filling up the ICU beds (or dying) as we rarely get very sick from Delta.

My daughter’s sister-in-law (vaccinated), a nurse, tested positive for Delta. Had mild symptoms for 2 days. Tested negative on the 3rd day. Enormous differences between that and the unvaccinated. By the way she caught it from her unvaccinated adult son, who spent several days in the hospital. He has since got vaccinated.

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I have no doubt that many people won’t change their minds now, even those who used the “it’s not approved” excuse previously. As you mentioned, there’s a lot of social media nonsense.
But if 10 million of the 90+ million US adults who aren’t vaccinated now change their minds, that’s still a big deal. One poll found that 44% of unvaccinated people would be more likely to get the jab once it’s approved.

I can’t speak for Arkansas, other than from family who live there, but most of those I know here in DFW who are unvaccinated will continue to remain unvaccinated. Hope you are right about 44% but I am skeptical based on what I am hearing.

Common statement here is “its my body & my choice about vaccinating & no one will convince me otherwise.”

Sad but true.