Next years pitching

We lose Campbell and Cronin and I think Kostyshock What about Scroggins, Kopps?

Possible starters next year Wicklander and Nolan. Who have we signed that can help? Any stud pitchers that we’ve signed that won’t go pro? What youngsters on this years roster can possibly help? Trest has looked decent at times. Who might close next year?

Lastly, other than Campbell and Cronin pitching has been very inconsistent. Another question I have is are they having a hard time adjusting to the new pitching coach? Is he as good as advertised? Not being critical of him, he’s working with a lot of youth. Just curious.

Campbell when talking to reporters on tv mentions Johnson for the split finger pitch that he’s added but I never hear him mention the new coach. Just asking for those that know baseball out there

Don’t forget Caleb Bolden who missed this season with TJ surgery. Hopefully he’s good to go next season.

I don’t think Hobbs got enough time with the team this past year to make too much of an impact (at least one that’s very visible to outsiders), or teach new pitches, etc. I don’t think he joined the staff until late November, which was after fall ball.

I expect Arkansas to sign some JUCO pitchers this spring who will add experience to the staff.

Barring a transfer, the returning pitchers who I think will be counted on most next season are Ramage, Kopps, Bolden, Noland, Wicklander, Denton and Vermillion. The roles are typically determined by how they pitch in the fall.

Campbell mentions Wes Johnson because that’s who taught him the pitch.

Bolden would have been huge this season.
I think Clay hit it right. I wish the young lefties would come out and get some positive work!

What ever happened to that kid, I think he was from Malvern and I think his name was Connor McCullough? When I saw his high school stats I was impressed. Did they send him to a junior college?

Hobbs was not my first choice for pitching coach but he was certainly Dave’s first choice and that is good enough. If I have a complaint about Hobbs, its that he doesn’t visit the mound enough. He seems to always be studying his clipboard.

McCullough did not have a good fall and transferred.

He has visited the mound more in conference games than he did in the non-conference season. Part of that probably has something to do with the pitchers struggling more.

But his personality - and by extension, his coaching style - is much different than Wes Johnson. Johnson is an in-your-face coach, whereas Hobbs has a more laid-back approach.

Surely we are bringing in a freshman who can contribute?? I know only Noland and wicklander have made an impression this year but I would think we have recruited somebody who can come in and help out next yr but this year group really has control problems hopefully we can get that straightened out.

There is really no way to know which freshmen are going to contribute until the draft signing deadline has passed and fall ball has begun.

Remember that there are new rules about mound visits:

[quote]Rule 6.5f To allow six (6) defensive conferences per game for a regulation game. A maximum of three (3) of these defensive conferences may include a coach.
Rationale
To improve pace of play by limiting the number of defensive conferences initiated by defensive players (such as the catcher or infielders) to three (3) beyond the three (3) visits the coach is currently permitted to make.
[/quote]

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I may be in the minority here, but I don’t like this new rule. I personally don’t have any issue with the length of college baseball games. I see it as limiting coaching opportunities in a league that should be recruiting top talent based on its appeal as a developmental league (among other things).

But, I get that shortening games might help increase the number of college games that end up on TV, the exposure from which can also help attract talent.

I may be in the minority here, but I don’t like this new rule. I personally don’t have any issue with the length of college baseball games. I see it as limiting coaching opportunities in a league that should be recruiting top talent based on its appeal as a developmental league (among other things).

But, I get that shortening games might help increase the number of college games that end up on TV, the exposure from which can also help attract talent.

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I understand the feeling, but replays have significantly lengthened the games. They’re too long, but I’d hate to get rid of replay. I’d rather limit coaching visits than stop replays or limit them. I’d also rather have to throw 4 pitches to intentionally walk a batter, but I guess that change shortens the game, too. Couldn’t help much though. Most games don’t have intentional walks & even those that have them usually have no more than 1, maybe 2.

I’d be for limiting the time allowed for a video review before a decision has to be given. I think the centralized review in the SEC has helped, but even it can be a little long at times.

I’m tired of all the concern about the games being too long.
I say leave the game alone!!! I’m tired of tv trying to dictate how the game is played. At 67, I guess I’m old school. I will admit though, at times these replays take way to long. If it’s something not that discernible, let the call stand.
JMHO!

I think you’ve got a very good humble opinion here, BoreHog.

I think that the centralized SEC review has sped up the review process tremendously. The review process for non-conference games is terribly slow.

I tend to agree with Bubba and Phil that something is missing without manager/coach and umpire arguments. Can you think about Earl Weaver without remembering some of his epic arguments with umps?

The thing that gripes me is the umps seem to have to have a meeting together and discuss a call before they go to replay. That lengthens the review process even more.

Blake Adams may be good enough to start. I know his mom and she wants him to enroll into college at Arkansas. He’s one that is so good DVH didn’t think he would turn down pro $$$. We’ll see.