NCAA supports uniform patches for social causes

Aloha,

Not that I have a vote, but personally I’m totally against the NCAA’s authorization allowing uniform patches supporting social causes. I’m not against social causes. Unfortunately too many people make bad decisions due to lack of all information. And are all social causes allowed? Or will the NCAA only allow specific social causes to be supported and not others? This is a bad idea which can be very divisive.

Why is it so hard to keep politics out of sports? Ugh.

GHG!

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I agree with you on this. Does the entire team have to agree on the cause? What if 10% don’t like the cause? I got no problem if an individual wants to take a knee during the anthem or something like that–free speech & all–but patches on uniforms, etc are a bad idea.

Maybe the worst idea the NCAA has ever had!

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And that is saying a lot!

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That idea of putting social causes on your jersey is idiotic. What a bunch of pansies. Well, this may start a boycott of college football by fans. If teams start kneeling at the National Anthem, you will see a boycott of fans that will damage college football.

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Aloha,

I greatly hope the UA will decide it will be uniform through all sports and NOT allow ANY social cause patches. Lets keep politics out of sports. PLEASE!

GHG!

That shouldn’t be a problem in college football because teams currently are in the locker room during the National Anthem.

I don’t even know where the teams are when the Anthem is played. I do know the Arkansas fans are very attentive to the Anthem and behave well here at Razorback Stadium, just as they do for the Alma Mater.

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Guy, as much as you would hope to keep politics/social causes and sports separate, that toothpaste is out of the tube and it ain’t going back in. It probably went out the evening that Minneapolis cop crushed the life out of George Floyd, or Breonna Taylor was shot eight times by the Louisville police as she slept. Given that football and basketball are both heavily minority sports, and minorities have found their voice on many issues this summer, they’re not going to go quietly and social issues are not going away,

Did anyone notice that Iowa released its investigation of the football program that found that Black athletes were essentially expected to act like white guys and disciplined if they didn’t? I’m sure that’s going to make it very difficult for the current Iowa staff to recruit black kids.

And if Arkansas doesn’t allow patches and our opponents do, darn straight they’ll use it against us in recruiting, “Those rednecks in Arkansas don’t care about your opinion or your freedom of expression,” etc.

This thread’s gonna get locked in 3, 2, 1…

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Dude…smh

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And back into my cave I go. I’ll check back with you guys in a few months. Or not.

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I agree, I think the NCAA made a big mistake, BIG!

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Ole Miss has already had to react in different stages of time to conform or risk recruiting for a generation. They took Colonel Reb off their helmets in the 80’s, banned the rebel flag in the 90’s, took Colonel Reb off the sidelines and replaced him with a black bear about 10 years ago, and finally removed Dixie from the band’s repertoire. A lot of us might have thought that was an attack on their tradition and heritage, but man you’ve got to be able to recruit. Arkansas played Dixie up until the late 60’s, but gave it up when integration started.

Even though you’re correct about all those Ole Miss references, there is a difference between having a mascot & tradition that itself is offensive to many people & allowing uniforms to have social cause patches on the uniforms. We’ve had players wear things like “John 3:16” on their eye-black, but those were all individual expressions. If players put “BLM” on theirs, I can’t see the difference between the two.

What I hope we don’t see is something that’s sewn onto the jersey or attached to the helmet. But lets also remember teams have been wearing pink for breast cancer on their uniforms for different games for several years now. I guess that’s a social cause, even if it’s a non-controversial one.

Regardless, I think Swine is right. The toothpaste is out of the tube & we’re gonna have to get used to it. I just hope it doesn’t go too far & cause divisions within the team. I see that as a danger.

Why would the patches be political? They going to mention foreign policy or the tax code? What is political about social causes?

If you don’t think a lot of the “Black Lives Matter” deal is not political, then you, my man, are really naive.

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Lou Holtz had it exactly right. During his team meeting prior to start of fall practice he told his team, among other things, each year. “We keel for the lord and stand for the flag”, “there are no causes in the locker room”, and my favorite “don’t tell people your problems; half the people don’t care and the other half are glad you’ve got 'em”.

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Good post bighog.

MIke Anderson would have no part of flag kneeling either. He said his father fought hard (in the military) for our freedom and his players would respect the flag.

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Stupid move. Cowardly move. Chicken S__t. move.

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Over the top response, what if someone wanted to wear a KKK badge? The “rebel” flag? I have relatives the right age, who if they were good enough to be on the team would want to have a “rebel” flag patch.

Social issues are political. In fact, in my opinion, more likely to get people angry than international relations.

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