More good pub for NWA

https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2021-11-30/austin-s-mega-growth-rubs-off-on-walmart-s-arkansas

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Is it really good, or bad? They both go hand in hand, I guess.

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Agree. More demand and then you have higher housing costs. Houses near downtown Bentonville are very, very high. Such a desirable area to live.

High growth = higher cost which eventually will lead to increase crime rate, increased homelessness, increases drug use and eventually urban blight.

I don’t know if my hamlet has growth. One sign on north end of Norfork says 511. The one on south end says 513.

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2 stray dogs were seen wandering around on the south side.
Or more likely, 2 lying trout fishermen said they were from Norfork.
We all know how fishermen have a tendency to streeeeetch the truth.:wink:

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The growth in NWA is great for the area and the state. I know many people pine for what it used to be like but if we want to ditch the stereotype of Arkansas to the nation this is necessary. I love Fayetteville particularly and in many ways it still feels the same as it did when I graduated in 94. Yet, the UA has grown and is competing more and more on the national level academically. My degree is becoming more valuable as a result. Arkansas needs the growth in NWA from a tax perspective. The area has so many things to offer. The cycling infrastructure is incredible. I seriously can’t wait until my house is finished and I move in around May.

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The cycling infrastructure should not be minimized. It’s incredible.

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NWA has changed forever, and yes that has good and bad aspects. But as Hog fans, we should be cognizant that the growth is very good for the university and the athletic program. Clemson, for example, has clearly benefitted as the northwest part of SoCar has grown (the Greenville metro area which includes Clemson has 932,000 residents and is growing at 2% per year).

Yes, NW Arkansas area is becoming the crown jewel of our State. The growth continues nonstop. It has all the amenities people want and is still affordable, but that is changing rapidly.

The natural beauty of the area and the outdoor opportunities abound. The University’s policy of giving out of state kids in state tuition if they meet certain academic standards certainly helped the University grow and will continue into the future. Right now, the sports programs are flourishing and kids want to come to be around winning programs. I don’t expect that to change. Many out of state parents as well as instate kids and parents will want to work and/or retire there. So I see the growth and progress in that area will continue well into the future.

I wish the same would said across our great State. Sadly that is not the case, I read where 53 counties in our State actually lost population. I suspect many are moving to more urban areas and some have probably moved to NW Arkansas. I don’t know what the answer is for our State, but NW Arkansas has found the right approach.

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That article RD linked noted that the rest of the state overall lost population from 2010-2020 but NWA gained enough to make up for it and then some.

I can account for two who bailed on NWA. Interestingly, I know of a bunch who bailed on NWA for Baxter County and have since moved back. Some of that was when grand kids arrived. I would guess we’d do the same thing but that does not appear to be in the cards.

Others moved back when they lost the love of fishing - or never acquired it when they thought they would.

There are people who fished a couple of times with guides and decided to move here. Then figured out they were not going to spend the time and energy to really learn how to fish.

I left Fayetteville in 1976 when I graduated and NWA has changed tremendously since then. My 34 year old daughter moved back to Fayetteville from Asheville, NC this year after a divorce and we helped her find and buy a house. She went through 4 bidding wars before she found a house she could afford. Prices for housing are shooting up and you can see it becoming overpriced in the future like Austin and California. The bike trails, Crystal Bridges, etc. are making it a world class environment and I expect demand for housing to exceed the supply for a very long time. As far as the rest of the state, the agriculture economies are still shrinking the demand for labor and those counties need to lose more population, not less, and get the unemployed moved to where they can find employment. So, that population loss is a good thing. The white flight out of Little Rock has filled the surrounding counties so that the overall population is stable. Investments are being made in Little Rock and Eldorado to enhance the quality of life and compete better for new residents. Urban crime and violence (mostly black on black) is a serious issue for Little Rock and Pine Bluff but that is a national trend and not unique to Arkansas. Running away from that and hoping it will not follow is not the solution and there is an ongoing fight to get that under control. Poverty is the cause and fixing that is not easy. We here in central Arkansas will soldier on. JMVHO

Some if it is just from growing old. My folks moved central ark out to beaver lake when they took early retirements in the early 90’s. Now they are getting up into their 80’s and it’s just too far out there, got to move back to town.

That may happen to me. I might be too old soon!

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They had almost 30 good years out there. They still love it, just a little too much to take care of on their own. I bet you’ve got a while yet.

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Little Rock has done a poor job enticing businesses to move there. North Little Rock has done much better as has other surrounding communities. It’s not just about white flight. Little Rock needs to get really serious about the crime issue or it’s just going to get worse. There is much gang on gang crime but that isn’t all they are targeting. A friend and her boyfriend just had their car sprayed by 32 bullets as they fled from an attempted robbery/carjacking. They are very lucky to be alive. It wasn’t in the impoverished part of town; it was in the Heights. New companies don’t want to come where there are crime problems. Some cities do a better job addressing it (crime) than others. Little Rock has done poor.

The city can’t do what people won’t do for themselves.

Poor administration in the mayors office and the police. North Little Rock and other surrounding communities seem to be doing a better job. NLR has made better use of tax incentives and other incentives to attract business and build the tax base.

One example here. Diamond Bear Brewery was in LR. They were paying heavily for water utilities but the city of LR wouldn’t cut them a break. They water was going into the beer and not impacting the sanitation side of things but LR wouldn’t budge. So they went to NLR. Makes no sense at all. I’m certain there are many more examples and that falls on the administration (and not just the current administration).

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That sounds so typical of LR. Stupid