LSU vs Auburn ending question for the rules experts...

Okay, I definately agree that LSU did not get the ball snapped before the
clock hit 0.00, so the play should not have counted. Thus no TD, so an
Auburn victory. That being said, did LSU get screwed on the play prior
to all that?

Let me set the scene:

Its 3rd and 16 and LSU throws a pass that Dupree catches and gets to the 9
yard line tackled in bounds with the clock running at 16 seconds. They are
then forced to scramble and get the ball snapped for a 4th down with the
clock running out. They manage to get the ball snapped with 5 seconds on
the clock, make a play to get a 1st down with 1 second left on the clock.
The clock stops since a 1st down was made… BUT wait one second, there was
an illegal shift so LSU must replay 4th down. The don’t have time to get the
ball snapped and the rest is history as they say.

My question, an illegal shift is a pre-snap penalty otherwise it would not
be illegal. If thats the case why was the clock not reset to 5 seconds. The
penalty kills the ball, its not declinable, the clock should have been reset
as if a play was never run. That would mean LSU should have had 5 seconds on
the last play and we know what then would have happened. TD LSU, Auburn loss.

Should LSU have been granted those 5 seconds?
Was this another SEC ref blunder?

I think sine it was an offensive foul, no time was added. I believe on a defensive foul, time would be added.

Mind you, I am far from an expert.

In the NCAA, it has to be a penalty that makes the officials blow the play dead - or dead-ball penalty. The play is not blown dead on an illegal shift, so the officials got it correct.

“My question, an illegal shift is a pre-snap penalty otherwise it would not
be illegal. If thats the case why was the clock not reset to 5 seconds. The
penalty kills the ball, its not declinable, the clock should have been reset
as if a play was never run.”

Not sure how you’re defining “pre-snap”, but while it does become a penalty at the snap, it’s like illegal motion or illegal formation or too many players on the field - the play runs and it’s up to the defense to accept or decline the penalty. The whistle was not blown at the time of the illegal shift, and the time the play takes is run off the clock.

According to “c”, shouldn’t the clock have started with the snap, instead of the ref’s signal?

Since the 10-second rule did not apply here, “c” did not apply either. This would be if it was a penalty that invoked the 10-second rule, whether Auburn had declined or accepted the 10-second runoff.

As for your initial question, the clock runs as if it were a normal play with no penalty, since the shift became illegal WHEN the ball was snapped, not before. Some of us still remember when there were no presnap penalties. If an offensive lineman moved, they ran the entire play, the time came off the clock, then afterward the defense was given the option just as it would be for holding or block in the back or whatever. I think that’s a fairly recent change in the rules.