Legendary Longhorn, Arkansas foe Tommy Nobis passes away

SIAP, but I did check and did not see anything here about this passing.

I understand that many will see this and wonder why I’m taking the time to post this about someone they may have never heard of, or know little about even if they’ve heard the name a time or two.

http://www.star-telegram.com/sports/col … 40679.html

For me, Nobis epitomizes what Texas football and Darrell Royal were all about in the 1960’s. It’s hard for fans today - that weren’t around in that period - to appreciate just how dominant he was, individually; and Texas was, as a program. And, there was a mutual respect between the Arkansas and Texas programs that ran from the Head Coaches through all the players. You just don’t see that kind of thing anymore.

One of my most satisfying memories of that era is that Arkansas beat Texas two of Nobis’ three seasons (freshmen were not eligible in those years). The quote I will always remember, which underscores Nobis’ focus and intensity, came after the 1964 season in which the Hogs famously upset defending National Champions Texas in Austin, 14-13. Interviewed coming into the 1965 season, Nobis simply said “I think a little bit about Arkansas every day.” Fortunately, for Razorback fans, he was still thinking about the Hogs after his visit to Fayetteville that October.

BTW, here’s a good, short read on Nobis and Texas from the 1965 Sports Illustrated pre-season magazine (link below). In those days, Texas Football (and it’s cousin, Arkansas Football, which ran the same stories, but with more coverage of the Razorbacks and Arkansas HS football) was the Bible. But for National Coverage, the SI pre-season issue was about as good as it got. Unlike the others, it came out just as the season was beginning, and so had some more current information (the other pre-season mags were put to bed and printed well before fall practices had started). In addition to the info on Nobis and Texas, there’s a pre-season look at the Razorbacks as well.

RIP, Tommy Nobis.

https://www.si.com/vault/1965/09/20/615 … -of-plenty

Remembis well. he was a great for sure and had nothing but respect for the Hogs. I remember when they beat us in '66, he said how good it felt to finally beat Arkansas. Always remembered that.

Enjoyed the read as well about the upcoming '65 season. October 16, 1965 is one of those dates that will always stick with me.

Tommy Nobis was truly a great football player. He was the poster
boy for what a linebacker should be.

Sad time for his family and all those Texas Longhorn football fans
that knew him and share in the pain of loss.

RIP Tommy Nobis, Linebacker.

Seems like he played both ways part of the time. OG and LB,great player tough as nails!

They did not change the rules to permit unlimited substitutions until the 1964 season. Arkansas was one of the few teams, maybe the only one, to take full advantage of the new rules, and that was one reason why we won the NC. Texas didn’t, so Nobis likely did play both ways in 1964. Of course we also went 10-0 in the next regular season when Texass and other schools got the hang of what was then called two-platoon football (the platoons being offense and defense).

Thanks Wiz. Nobis was a great football player for Coach Royal.

Prayers for his family.

Well, I saw him play. Yep, I’m that old. Great football player, lots of intensity.

However, my favorite linebacker was Wayne Harris. Number 55, The Thumper, was amazing.

Here are two recomendation for the upcoming football season:

Give number 55, which used to represent the star linebacker for the razorbacks, to the meanest linebacker dude. Maybe that is Harris. Revive the tradition, it will mean a lot to us old crocodiles.

Encourage Cole Kelly to lose 20 pounds.

He is as revered in Atlanta as he is in Austin. The first Falcon and an outstanding citizen. 30 years ago I had an advertising sales job that did a little business with the Falcons. I remember my surprise, delight and slight apprehension of my first sales call to Tommy Nobis. He was an unbelievably down to earth and genuinely nice man. Probably my favorite Longhorn of all time.

[quote=“ColoradoHog”]

Remembis well. he was a great for sure and had nothing but respect for the Hogs. I remember when they beat us in '66, he said how good it felt to finally beat Arkansas. Always remembered that.

[/quote]Actually, the only season Nobis enjoyed a win over Arkansas was his soph year of 1963, when the Horns held off the scrappy Hogs 17-13 during UT’s undefeated National Championship season. The Razorbacks won his junior (1964) and senior (1965) seasons. And, even though Nobis had moved on to Atlanta by then, the Hogs also prevailed at Austin again in 1966 to give Broyles his only 3 game winning steak in the series.

This was a great thread!

Texas did not beat Arkansas in 66, in fact Arkansas beat Texas 1964,1965,1966. The only time that happened in Broyles career. We beat Texas in Austin in 1966 12-7.

I remember Tommy Nobis in name only. HE was TEXAS. One of the reason for the ones that remember just hated Texas. JUST hated.

I guess there was not much coverage of the NFL back then. And to be honest I didn’t follow his career.

From “They remember what ya do in November” The State of Arkansas and myself Tommy Nobis prayers for everyone in the family…

An Arkansas offensive lineman, named Cunningham if I recall correctly, was a high school teammate of Nobis from San Antonio. He tried to shake Nobis’ hand on the field after the game, but Nobis refused. I was a student then and attended all three games 1964-66. At that time, we thought beating a Texas team ranked “Number 1” coming into the game was probable, even expected.

[quote=“Flashman1”]

An Arkansas offensive lineman, named Cunningham if I recall correctly, was a high school teammate of Nobis from San Antonio. He tried to shake Nobis’ hand on the field after the game, but Nobis refused. I was a student then and attended all three games 1964-66. At that time, we thought beating a Texas team ranked “Number 1” coming into the game was probable, even expected.

[/quote]IIRC, we had an O lineman named Dick Cunningham at the time who was an all SWC player. Must be who you are talking about.

And, you are right. In those days, the Razorbacks (and their fans) expected a win every time they took the field. Any loss was a bitter disappointment.

He was probably the best linebacker I ever saw even though he was from Texas. If he had a chance to play on a good NFL teamm he would have been known for his pro career as much as his college career.

After the 65 game, I walked by the Texas dressing room long after the game. Everyone else was showered and out of the uniforms. Nobis was still sitting down in his uniform staring at the floor. I think no one had the nerve to tell him to get dressed.

Back in those days we hated Texas but respected them. At least since the 80s it is just hate, no respect.

You could say Nobis won our national championship for us by stopping Alabama and Joe Namath on the goal line in the Orange Bowl.

For those interested, a story from the Atlanta paper on how Nobis came to be a Falcon and not an Oiler.

<LINK_TEXT text=“http://www.myajc.com/sports/the-first-f … MtUJQX0QO/”>http://www.myajc.com/sports/the-first-falcon-tommy-nobis-was-epic-and-barely-made-atlanta/GTsnCfv64bKGBMtUJQX0QO/</LINK_TEXT>

[quote]Back in those days we hated Texas but respected them. At least since the 80s it is just hate, no respect.
[/quote]

Darn right they respected us; they knew if they showed up with anything less than their A game (and a few times when they had their A game), we’d beat their butts. Somewhere along the way the Fallopian fans decided we were inferior and not worth their respect. I don’t think it filtered down to their team and coaches; we still laid some whuppins on them after the fans had dismissed us, and if any of them didn’t think we were capable of that, they soon found out otherwise. Such as 1-1-00. Never will forget the Teasip fan (in the stereotypical cowboy hat) about five rows in front of me that morning in Dallas who loudly proclaimed for most of the first half how we were no match for them. Then he got quieter and quieter, and by mid-fourth quarter he was headed for the exit. I’ll give him credit for graciously accepting all of our verbal abuse, which he had been inviting for the previous three hours.