Blindside block

Was called on us today with targeting. The targeting call was overturned. I was just watching BYU’s first touchdown and the block that sprung it was a blindside block. They threw and flag and picked it up because it was behind the line of scrimmage. I though any blindside block was illegal.

1 Like

Good point so what is correct?

Pick routes are ran all the time and the chance of them being called is about 1%. That’s why I wish we would run a whole lot more of them, we kind of ran one when we ran the wheel route to Dubinion because Hazelwood came across the middle and kind of turned sideways and made a little bit of contact with the guy who would have been trying to get over the top to cover him and it opened up perfectly for us.
You should never be able to do that IMO whether it’s on or behind the line of scrimmage because it’s basically cheating if I can block you from covering the guy you’re going to be covering he’s going to obviously be wide open… have never understood why they don’t call it every time that happens.

Watch the replay. He was hit blindside.

1 Like

Really thought we were the victim of some marginal calls, I am not certain I really understand the rule on the blindside block. I guess I viewed kind of like the basketball call where if you got in front of the opponent and they did not have the chance to see you to avoid running over you, it would be called. The call against Bax looked close enough to not call, just like I thought a couple of the interference calls were borderline at best— our defense got flagged, but seems our offense was not as fortunate.

I didn’t think it was blindside, it was just a block in the back, which should’ve been illegal whether the pass was behind the line or not. One of several bad calls that went against us. But in fairness, there were several bad calls that went against BYU as well.

1 Like

I thought we were told these were SEC refs. If so, what would their performance early in the game indicate?

I think the announce crew was vocal about a couple of situations, like a bad spot and that the fumble being after progressing was stopped. The receiver was still fighting when he fumbled, so not sure I agreed with them there.

1 Like

Block in the back is blindside. It was in the back totally.

What was Bax supposed to do there, get out of the defenders way, He blocked the guy squared up from the front shoulder to chest. Picture perfect how you’re taught from pop warner.
I get the no chop blocks at the knees but some of this other stuff

2 Likes

Yeah I didn’t think the fumble was a bad call, but the spot was bad and at least one of their PI’s were as weak as the ones called on us. Again, the calls on us were bad, but I think it was just general incompetence vs. some kind of screw job against us.

Incompetence is the key word in a lot of instances. The “screw jobs” we’ve had were (IMO) not targeted at us but we the result of incompetence among SEC refs.

2 Likes

Incompetence breeds screw jobs.

3 Likes

That was another call I thought was complete a**.

Yes and vice versa.

Have seen worse refereeing this year in the SEC than ever before… These guys have just got to do a better job.

3 Likes

They will never do a better job when they are not held accountable for the poor job they are doing.

I understand it is a hard job, but it can be done better and should be.

SEC needs to hold them accountable

1 Like

Yesterday’s game had me thinking “they really do just hate Arkansas” but once you calm down you realize it’s just like you said. Incompetence.

2 Likes

He could have passed up the chance to hit the guy. The play was on the other side of the field. There was no reason to hit the guy.

he should have screened and not initiated a hard block, nothing that Sam would quibble about. That block was intended to be outlawed. Im sure Coach Fountain has advice for the similar on punt returns, other common place is interceptions. The PI’s were awful and totally unexplainable, typical of good ole boy network among incompetent SEC officials protecting themselves. I bet the written report would be hard to find any semblance to what we saw on the field. Steve Shaw was the epitome of the Peter Principle where you rise to your level of incompetence.