Being said by another reporter that Jax Robinson was

forced out and really didn’t want to leave. This guy is saying Jax just found out in the last 48 hours that he had to leave.

Does this really sound right? Would Muss really force Jax out after the deadline to enter the portal???

I hope none of this is true. It would really be a bad look for us and yes I know this goes on other places.

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I was told he was leaving a few months ago (around the time of the SECT). Was told Muss was working with him behind the scenes to secure a good place to go.

I think baked has it right. The rumor has been he was leaving ever since the season was over. That other reporter is just trying to stir things up in my opinion.

I don’t have any insider knowledge about what goes on behind the scenes. But I’ve watched and listened to a lot of Muss interviews. He is really an open book about the way he does things. My impression is that he is honest with all of his players after the season is over, telling them where they stand, what they need to work on to earn playing time, etc.

With the recruits he has coming in, and his confidence in addressing needs through the portal, there were obviously a lot of players on last year’s team that were going to be passed by for PT unless they improved greatly. I suspect that’s how “these things work themselves out”.

I also believe that Muss is honestly interested in helping all of his players reach their goals so it’s easy for me to believe that he would work behind the scenes to help a player find a good fit.

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Perfectly stated!

That procedure workied in my day, the early 50’s but it was somewhat different that in the old days a player could not be forced off if he really fought it. The usual statement was the player chose to leave for playing time etc.

But in my day there were like 125 or more scholarships in football and less need for transfers.
But title 9 changed a lot of things.

Maybe if he had chosen Arkansas in the first place like he’d led most to believe it would have worked out. Who knows? He wants to play and I believe the coaches are being honest with him and telling him his best chances are somewhere else.

Title IX had nothing to do with this. Back in the day football and basketball scholies were 4 years. Read “Meat on the Hoof” to see the lengths they went to to get those players to leave.

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I assumed title 9 reduced the number of schollies and made them scholarships not full 4 year things. I’ll see if I can find that book…

May 1 deadline had no bearing on transfer for Jaxson as he had already transferred once … he will require a waiver to be immediately eligible at another D1 school … it has been reported Muss is supportive of waivers for players transferring out, but it is ultimately the NCAA’s decision.

Like the professional ranks, significant roster turnover is now the norm in college (along with pay for play) … as excited as fans are about the new high school recruits and transfers, odds are half of them - 5 or 6 - won’t be around the following year … Hogs are fortunate to have a coach who already knows how to navigate the new era.

Wax

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NCAA schools being cheap (and letting the ASUs of the world dictate to everyone else) changed the scholarship rules. Title IX had a role, but a small one.

When athletic scholarships were created in the 1950s, they were required to be multiyear; the rationale was that prevented “pay for play” (funny how the same themes keep cropping up over and over where the NCAA is concerned).

Title IX went into effect in 1972 (blame Richard Nixon if you must; he signed it into law). The football scholarship limits were reduced to 105 the next year and multiyear scholarships were also banned. In 1978 they cut it again to 95, and in 1994 to the current 85. It would be a huge stretch to blame TIX for the 78 and 94 cuts.

Multiyear scholarships became legal again in 2012. Some schools give them, some don’t, and the schools that do don’t give them to everybody. The ones who don’t point to the fact that the schools who do can still run players off, no matter what the term of the scholarship is.

I always assumed Title nine requiring an equal number of male and female schollies forced the reduction in mens since football has no equivilent female sport, IMO.

I always thought that is the reason some schools have female swimming but not male etc.

I do think there will be some problems getting a new world in NCAA sports, but I hope the schools do in fact get involved and bring about a decent system. But alas, money usually is the final decision.

I always thought the main reason for scholarship limits was to keep schools like Bama and Texas from sucking up all the kids, including ones they figured would never play for them, but didn’t want those kids going to other schools.

I also thought Title IX was a part of the change in the limits (such as mens basketball being 13) but not the main reason for them.

I have also thought the stupidly low limits in sports like track and baseball, were the fault of the ASU’s of the world.

Could be wrong on all accounts!

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Does a scholarship open with departure of Robinson?

Yes it did, and we gave it to Council

The sports that are played by both sexes (or close enough like baseball/softball), the scholarship limits are higher for the women every time. That’s Title IX. That also would not be necessary if there were a female sport analogous to football, gobbling up 85 scholarships. IIRC the highest female scholarship limit is 25, and it’s something weird like rowing. Which may explain why Texass has a rowing team.

There is absolutely no question that if the Power Five schools were able to set their own scholarship limits, they would be higher in almost every sport. I don’t know that it would be higher in basketball (13 is really plenty) or even football, but all the “minor” sports like baseball, track, etc. And I’m hearing a lot that with the ongoing NCAA reorganization, sports will be able to self-govern and its entirely possible that baseball will be able to go beyond 11.7 and so on.